Communication For Managers

Communication undoubtedly plays in the success or failure of managers. Google for the most important skills for managers and business leaders, one would definitely find communication  rated at or near the top.

Managers and executives must be able to think on the fly and adopt most suited communication manners/mechanism for each situation and each audience.

Business leaders have often used this phrase – “Survival of the Fittest”. It is nice-sounding, easy-to-swallow, seemingly plausible phrase used to address efficiency issues and motivating employees to put more smart efforts to excel in their domains. This works in many cases but the central question is: why do some companies thrive, while others perish? Why do some companies make extravagant profits, while others scrape by on bare subsistence? What is the secret to success? What is the secret to survival?

Students at IPER PGDM were put to group discussion with the topic tweaked as ‘Fittest to survive does not apply anymore’.  This group discussion was held as part of the  BEAT session organised for IPER PGDM students and coordinated by Prof. Ravi Chatterjee.

BEAT sessions aims to imbibe effective communication skills. It is significant for managers in the organizations so as to perform the basic functions of management, i.e., Planning, Organizing, Leading and Controlling. Communication plays a very essential part in these and managers generally devote a great part of their time in communication. This BEAT session featured communication activity to understand the difference between independent and dependent clauses. This knowledge can also help in varying sentence length in writing, which makes all forms of writing better.

Participants were involved in finding ‘independent clause’ in sentences. The objective of this activity was to explain how to write better sentences by knowing how ‘dependent clause’ & ‘independent clause’ can be used to dilute or strengthen a sentence.

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